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Cost Benefit Analysis

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“Home Economics”; Findings from a Cost Benefit Analysis of Housing and Support Services. This report was prepared by Common Knowledge Research and Consulting in partnership with CCPA (Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives) and released in November 2014.

This cost-benefit analysis was conducted in a framework that places the public interest at the centre and seeks to demonstrate the benefits that accrue to all community members; as Individuals, Community and our Society. For the purpose of examining the work done by Adsum it is critical to allow for a broader interpretation of success.

From an investor’s perspective, Adsum offers an excellent return. The work of Adsum for Women & Children creates at least $ $172,857.07 in net benefits per year. The organization is able to take funding provided by government and use it to leverage an almost equal amount.

For each dollar invested, Adsum for Women & Children creates at least $1.09 in individual, community and societal benefits. Thanks to additional sources of revenue, including rental income and charitable donations, government only funds 53% of Adsum’s expenses. The direct savings to government provided by Adsum’s services more than cover the entire cost of what government contributes to its operations. Every dollar that government invests in Adsum saves government $2.05.

This analysis raises questions for us to consider as a community. The questions do not relate to Adsum as an organization, but the context in which it operates.

• How much time and effort is it reasonable to expect not-for-profit organizations to spend on fundraising versus providing services to their clients?

• If housing is indeed a human right, doesn’t our government have a responsibility to ensure that those in need have access to affordable, quality, housing in the most effective way no matter the cost?

• How can we best recognize, support and invest in the work of successful non-profit, community- based organizations like Adsum for Women & Children?